Caterpillar Burger

We rarely have hotdogs and we had some leftover from the weekend. I decided to cook a hotdog for my lunch. I didn’t have any hotdog buns though. I had only hamburger buns. I wasn’t in the mood to use loaf bread for my hotdog bun and I almost decided not to cook one…
Then I remembered how we used to have quite a bit of fun making hotdog-burgers when I was a little girl. It was such a fun idea and the memories of those days of yore brought a smile to my heart.

*I changed the name of my hotdog-burger to ‘Caterpillar Burger’. Back in 2012, my blogging buddy Tina suggested it and that’s what I’ve called it ever since. Thanks Tina! 🙂

Here’s a set of pictures I took, as I fixed the hotdog,
to share with you, in case you may want to do this too.Down the length of the hotdog, carefully
cut slits a bit more than halfway through.
Place the hotdog in a pan of water
on the stove at med high heat.
Heat water to a full rolling boil.Allow it to boil for a few minutes until
the hotdog bends as far as it seems it will.
Carefully remove hotdog from pan of water
and allow to drain on a paper towel or cloth. If need be, Carefully, bend the hotdog into a circle.
Place hotdog on a hamburger bun. You can enjoy it like this or go to the next step.
Place a slice of cheese on top of the hotdog. You can enjoy it like this or go to the next step.
Place bun on a microwavable safe dish,
microwave for a few seconds until the
cheese is just melted over the hotdog. Allow the hotdog to set until
it’s cool enough to safely eat.

Add chili, mustard or ketchup or
your favorite relish and enjoy.

Tah-dah! And there you have it folks a ‘Caterpillar Burger’.

Happy Creative Cooking!

*I don’t know if microwaved hotdogs will cook and bend in a circle, I’ve never tried them.

 

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Using a Mason Jar with a blender For a Single Smoothie

 

My sister has one of those handy dandy single smoothie blender thingies. Like a good little sister still following in her big sister’s footsteps, I wanted one too. I use my blender for smoothies. It’s a bit off-putting to have to wash the many parts for one little old smoothie. So, as I said, I wanted a single smoothie maker.

I went shopping around the internet and was quite dismayed by the prices of the better rated single smoothie makers. I was sad and thought that I’d just stick with my blender… ~sigh of dismay~ and then my little old gears began to turn in my mind and brought forth a memory…

Back in 2001, after a stroke, my Mom couldn’t eat solid foods anymore. My Brother was her primary caretaker and he figured out a way to puree several different foods and keep them on hand without having to clean a complete blender every time: he used mason jars instead of the blender’s pitcher container.
It’s such a clever idea, I asked him how he thought of it.
He told me that back in his younger days, he and his friends made daiquiris in mason jars.
I think it was wonderful he remembered it. I believe that God teaches us things to use later on in life, even when we’re not aware of it. I think the lesson of the mason jar and blender was meant to help during the time of his caring for our Mother.
Mom was certainly grateful for his knowledge and tender care in helping her to try and get better. I wish Mom was still with us. I think she would enjoy the smoothie craze. She loved making milkshakes for us young’uns and our Dad. Mom loved making new recipes, especially dessert type foods.

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After remembering about the mason jar and blender idea, I got a pint mason jar,  put some ingredients in it and happily made a single smoothie.
Goodness it was tasty and clean up was so much easier.

Unfortunately, not all blenders are mason jar friendly. However, if your blender is one that can be used with a mason jar and if you decide to use this idea, some of my following suggestion might be helpful:
-follow blender manufacturers recommendation about ice or frozen ingredients.
-fill the jar only about 3/4 or less of-the-way full,
-make sure the blender collar fits the neck of the jar securely

-use quick ‘pulses’ until you’ve chopped up the crushed ice or/and frozen fruit and/or large chunks of foods. After it’s fairly well chopped up, blend it normally.
-now and then you may need to take the jar off the blender base, leave the blender collar/blades on the jar, shake the food down and then put the jar back on the base to blend some more.
-you can pour your smoothie in a glass or do like I do and drink it from the jar.

I’m glad I remembered the mason jar/blender idea. I use it for more than smoothies. It’s easy to chop nuts, bread crumbs, crackers or other things, put a ring/lid on the jar and save them for later.

Do you have a favorite blender recipe or helpful hint?
Wishing you a smooth rest of the week.

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Flashback Friday – Bunny Sculpt Tutorial

bun4Today I’m going to start having  ‘Flashback Fridays’ each week where I’ll re-post a craft or something from my old blog ‘Enjoyingcreating‘. I have several crafts and things from it that I think would be fun to share again here on my new blog. Plus, this gives me another opportunity to keep my blog active.

I hope you all will enjoy seeing my crafts and things from years past on my ‘Flashback Fridays’ postings.

To start my ‘Flashback Fridays’,  since we’re in the early throws of Spring and Easter is coming up soon, I decided to post my ‘Bunny Sculpt tutorial’.

This little bunny is about 2 1/4 inches long when it’s finished. The photos make it look bigger. It’s cuter in real life.

bunnydance

Let me know if you or your children make a bunny by this tutorial. And be sure to take some pictures too. I’d love to see your creative little bunnies.

I originally made this tutorial for polymer clay, but you can use homemade clay or air-dry clay.

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If you use air-dry or homemade clay, please remember to ignore the baking instructions.

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Bunny Sculpt Tutorial
~Adult supervision is required~

Supplies:
polymer clay or an air dry clay
a toothpick

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Make the following pieces:
1 – 1 1/2 inch oblong ball of clay for body
1 – 1/2 inch round ball of clay for head
4 – 1/4 inch small oblong balls for feet
1 – 1/4 inch round ball for tail
2 – 1/2 inch cone shapes for ears
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Press the clay in place as follows:
1/4 inch round ball on one end of the oblong body.
1/2 inch head ball at the other end of oblong body.
4 small oblong balls in feet positions.
2 cone shapes on top of head for ears
bun3
bun4Next you need:
1 tiny light pink ball of clay
2 tiny dark pink balls of clay

Press the clay in place as follows:
2 dark pink clay balls in eye positions
1 light pink ball in nose position
Take a toothpick and draw a smile
and dent the eyes to make pupils

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If you’re using air dry clay, you’re finished.
Set your Bunny sculpt somewhere safe and let it dry.

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If you’re using bakeable clay then go to the next steps.

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Before baking,
Pierce the body underneath to allow
clay to bake thoroughly so it won’t
crack or poof or something.

Bake the polymer clay bunny at the manufacturers recommended temperature and for the recommended length of time.
Allow bunny to cool before touching.
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Tah – dah, you’re done and have a wee little bunny figurine.
bun6

bunnydance

I hope you all enjoyed my Flashback Friday.
It was fun sharing my bunny sculpt with you.
It’s always been one of my favorite sculpts
because it’s simple and makes me smile.

Here’s wishing you all a hoppy good weekend!
bunnydance
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